Eric Lefkofsky’s Tempus offers Immediate Cancer Patient Data

In the year 2006, Eric and Liz Lefkofsky founded the ‘Lefkofsky Family Foundation’. The mission of this group is to “…advance high-impact programs, initiatives, and research that enhance quality of human life…” Major proportion of donations is provided to Chicago-based groups who concentrate on education, human rights, research in medicine, the arts, and cultural outreach.Eric worked his way through college as a carpet salesman. He attended the University of Michigan, studying law. After graduation, he and a friend partnered to create a clothing store which did not succeed, and found himself in years of lawsuits due to the failure. However, not all his ventures have been failures. He started Groupon, which is one of the highest successes in Internet IPOs, to date.

Motivation is key to most ventures. Lefkofsky was motivated to look into cancer treatment methods when his wife was delivered a breast cancer diagnosis. Though not a physician, he realized that care of a patient is more than giving them chemicals to fight the disease. Doctors and other healthcare professionals should have an immediate and efficient method of gathering data.Much of cancer treatment comes from research. Lefkofsky discovered, through his own investigations, that patient clinical data is not readily available from cancer treatment facilities. Facilities must endure bureaucratic red-tape in order to compile information on patients. This information includes, types of medications being given, dosages, and how often. They also should know other factors like age and sex of patient, as well as whether they have any other illnesses.

Understanding this lack of efficient patient data collecting, Tempus is aimed at streamlining the data collecting process. He is working to combine molecular data, such as a patient’s cancer, growth rate and efficacy of treatment, with personal data about the patients such as their age, their weight, living conditions, diet, and health.Lefkofsky’s question regarding why some patients respond to treatment while others do not prompted his concern and interest in helping to develop a method of immediately acquiring all data. If busy cancer research centers can obtain this data quickly, they will be more effective in compiling new data sets that will help them to evaluate drugs and effects more rapidly.

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